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Posted:  6/23/2007 9:34 PM #12619
Semper Paratus


Joined: 2/23/2007
Posts: 288
Last Post: 5/18/2008
Subject: CZ-52
I was wondering if I could hear some reviews of the CZ-52, do they jam alot? are they sturdy? I just saw how much they cost and how cheap ammo is, I am thinking about picking one up, so any pros or cons and I will thank you.
"I won't be wronged, I won't be insulted, and I won't be laid a hand on. I don't do these things to other people and I require the same from them."

Posted:  6/24/2007 9:44 AM #12618
General Protection Fault


Joined: 5/21/2007
Posts: 74
Last Post: 4/10/2009
I assuming you mean the CZ-52 pistol, and not the rifle...

I'd like to hear a little more personal experience about it, too. A CZ-52 is one of the first things I want to order if the BATF ever approves me for my C&;R license. Anything to watch out for when ordering one online? Are there any sites offering CZ-52's to stay away from, and any that are recommended?


If it helps, I have seen some articles about the CZ-52 online which describe some common issues to look out for. The best was at: http://makarov.com/cz52/


The most serious problems: don't dry-fire a CZ-52 - it weakens the firing pin, and could lead to breakage. Inspect a new CZ-52 to make sure the firing pin, or a piece of the firing pin, isn't jammed. The de-cocking mechanism, built into the safety, might get worn, and result in the pistol firing instead of de-cocking - that would definitely be something to beware of. Also, be careful of the ammunition - there's a kind of 7.62x25 that was designed for submachine guns which is too powerful for the CZ-52. I never really saw an explanation of what happens when this stuff is used, but it seems a safe bet that nothing good could come from it. Note that the CZ-52 can easily be converted to fire 9mm cartridges by changing the barrel, and mixing the ammunition up here can also be a serious problem, while the 9mm conversion creates some other reliability and maintanence problems of its own.

I suppose these cautions would be similar to those for the SKS - they're something to watch out for, and your chances of having it happen increase with the amount of abuse your weapon has recieved and the degree to which you "bubba" with it, but for the most part you should be able to use the gun safely as long as you take care of it, inspect it carefully for problems before using it, and follow the basic firearm safety rules.



Some minor issues you might also want to watch out for: According to some reviews and articles, the modern, after-market magazines are evidentally not as well-made as the originals, and may be prone to mis-feeding the ammo. (Maybe some day, somebody somewhere will start making aftermarket magazines that are better than the originals? We could dream....) And I've seen some people say that their CZ-52's arrrived with a lot of scratches and "tooling and handling marks", which didn't have much of an effect on the gun's performance but which did detract from the cosmetic appearance.




Aside from those potential problems, the photos I've seen of these things at least make them look sturdy enough - they appear to be big, heavy, mean-looking guns, and the 7.62x25 ammo I got from Cheaper than Dirt looks like it definitely means business (based on one test I saw online, this stuff will punch through Kevlar helmets!) The CZ-52 is popular with the C&;R crowd, and I haven't seen anyone say "stay away from these things" yet. There are a couple of places that sell these things and charge a little extra to hand-pick a good one, and I believe I will probably have them do just that.

Posted:  7/1/2007 1:44 AM #12616
STELLA


Joined: 2/17/2006
Posts: 250
Last Post: 2/15/2007
I picked up one of these awhile ago. The main things to watch out for is a weak firing pin which will break if dry fired too much, just buy a new steel pin for about $10. Most of the surplus ammo will be corrosive so be sure to clean afterwards.
Not positive of the age of this but go to this site to read about the ammo to stay away from

http://www.geocities.com/Yosemite/Gorge/4653/bad.htm

There are a few companies out there that make new reloadable ammo for this firearm. As far as reliability is concerned, I would rate this towards the top of the list. After firing over 100 rnds at slow and fast fire rates using surplus ammo not a single jam or hiccup. The roller locking mechancism is similar to the h&;k g3 system. The only cons would be the lack of a slide release like on a 1911, however that can be modified with the available parts kits, and the euro-style mag release at the bottom of the grip. I won't go much into accuracy except to say I would consider the accuracy of my specimen to be decent. Too many variables to give a good brief on accuracy of the firearm.

Posted:  7/1/2007 9:52 AM #12615
Semper Paratus


Joined: 2/23/2007
Posts: 288
Last Post: 5/18/2008
Thanks for the help guys. 8)
"I won't be wronged, I won't be insulted, and I won't be laid a hand on. I don't do these things to other people and I require the same from them."

Posted:  8/28/2007 11:49 AM #12588
woad_yurt


Joined: 8/27/2007
Posts: 11
Last Post: 9/26/2007
Subject: Re: CZ-52
Semper Paratus-I was wondering if I could hear some reviews of the CZ-52, do they jam alot? are they sturdy? I just saw how much they cost and how cheap ammo is, I am thinking about picking one up, so any pros or cons and I will thank you.

I have 2 of them. One is a regular military issue and the other is a chromed one from Classic Arms. They have a great customer service attitude, at least with me. http://www.classicarms.us

First, the negatives: They have their quirks. The magazine bottom needs to be pinched a bit to make sure that it doesn't slide off of the magazine body. If it does, while shooting, the spring pops out and bounces to God knows where. A second or two with a pliers will fix that. Also, the firing pins are a little brittle so dry-firing may break them. But, steel one ones are available for $10. I have the originals in mine and have had no issues after firing thousands of rounds w/them. The sights may take a little getting used to.

Positives: The gun blows away a .45 ACP, power-wise. It takes 30 seconds to break down for cleaning. It's the pistol equivalent of a Model T Ford. It's very rugged, very dependable and very accurate. If you're a halfway decent shot, you hit a silhoutte target at 100 yards consistently. Some of the surplus ammo has very hard primers and will need a second tap to fire so I took the grips off and put a little 5 cent washer under the hammer spring as a spacer; problem solved. It's a killer gun and the hollowpoint ammo from Wolf makes a giant hole; the hardball surplus ammo will shoot through a school bus the long way. Oh yeah, I almost forgot: When I go to the range, people stop and look. If the lighting is a little dim, like late afternoon or in an indoor range, you'll see flame shoot more than a foot out of the muzzle and the sound really gets some attention. I think it's the best semi-auto I've ever shot and they only cost $129 or so dollars. The ammo cost me $129 for 1244 rounds at AIM Surplus and it goes 1500 FPS, too. It's a better gun than others selling for 3 times as much. Get one!
"Facts are stubborn things; and whatever may be our wishes, our inclinations, or the dictates of our passions, they cannot alter the state of facts and evidence." John Quincy Adams

Posted:  2/28/2008 5:03 PM #12586
General Protection Fault


Joined: 5/21/2007
Posts: 74
Last Post: 4/10/2009
Subject: Bought three of them...
I bought three of these late last year as soon as I got my C&;R license.

Two of them have worked flawlessly - they are great little guns.

The third one doesn't fire about 1 out of every 4 cartridges. The primer is dented, but doesn't go off; the unfired cartridges work just fine in the other guns. I tried cleaning up the firing pin channel with no better success. I wish I'd seen woad_yurt's tip about the washer before I ordered a new firing pin - sounds like that will probably fix it right up :( (I guess that's not a total loss: it shouldn't hurt to have a spare firing pin around for these things.)

The other two CZ-52's have been great, though. And if you like the CZ-52, I think you'll like the Tokarev as well: it fires the same cartridge, and my Polish Tokarev seems to be a nice, trouble-free gun for me - I'll be getting a couple more of these eventually. I think the Tokarev is a much uglier gun, but that's still OK - I guess for me that's part of the charm of these C&;R commie guns :)

Posted:  10/21/2008 11:10 AM #12557
gandog56


Joined: 8/13/2006
Posts: 11
Last Post: 10/21/2008
Positives- Never had a jam, ammo puts out a nice fireball, recoil is not too bad, ammo fairly cheap

Negatives- Bad trigger slap, not all that accurate, magazine hard to remove, bottlenose cartridges a bear to reload.

Posted:  11/19/2008 4:46 PM #12564
archy


Joined: 2/17/2006
Posts: 14
Last Post: 11/19/2008
Subject: Re: CZ-52
I love mine, have a second one ordered and hopefully on the way. When you get yours, get an extra magazine if you can, the original ones work and the aftermarket ones do...sometimes. They're not the easiest thing to find holsters for, the nylon adjustable ones from CTD are one of the few instances where I can really reccomend cheapie holsters, though a GI M7 .45/M9 Beretta shoulder holster works with a little help.

Get an extra firing pin before yours breaks. Don't dry fire it, and it may not, but usually when they go, it's the tip that breaks off and you may not notice it unless you think to check for it...like EVERY time you clean it. Even if you don't need your spare, you may find yourself pegged as *the guy with one of those loud Czech pistols* as I was, and somebody else needing parts will look you up- I took mine for qualification day, and all the local cops using .40 and .357 Glocks noticed that SOMEBODY was using something a LOT noisier. Among other things we found out: A Vz52 using Czech ammo fired at an old Level III ballistic vest draped over an office chair goes right through the front of the vest, then through the chair, then out the back of the vest, and then through a 2x4 target holder in front of the dirt berm backstop.

I've so far accumulated six magazines for mine, though they'll be spread among the second gun coming in. But 6 times eight rounds works out to a real handy 48 rounds, with two of the single-stack magazines carried in either cell of a magazine pouch meant for two of the big Glock 20 magazines.

FYI, Centerfire Systems in Kentucky has the manuals for the guns for around $4.00, and that's worth getting, but you can get by for a start with the online guide here: http://www.surplusrifle.com/pistolcz52/disassemble/index.asp

and the exploded drawing here: http://www.buymilsurp.com/pictorials/cz52pictorial.jpg

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