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Posted:  6/9/2014 9:29 AM #41996
CTD Blogger


Joined: 7/14/2009
Posts: 10828
Last Post: 8/20/2014
Subject: Beretta ARX 100: The Ultimate Tactical Rifle-Review-VIDEO
GunsAmerica, by Dave Higginbotham- After what feels like an absurdly long wait, Beretta is shipping the ARX 100 in 5.56. This is the civilian version of a battle rifle that’s currently in service in Italy and a handful of other countries. The rifle combines the operational familiarity of both the AR-15 platform and the AK platform into a versatile rifle that’s built for active service. Every detail of the gun is adaptable. Controls can be switched easily, without tools. Even the various calibers of barrels are interchangeable, on the fly. It is an impressive rifle. Beretta is calling the ARX 100 “The Ultimate Tactical Rifle.” Is it true?
What video here.

I’m not ready to answer that question. This is our first look at the rifle. I picked the gun up from my FFL this morning and had it on the range by noon. The sun has set, and I’m in front of the computer trying to make sense of my first impressions. Is it the Ultimate? Making that assertion is forcing us into a game of comparisons, a game gun reviewers (most shooters, really) are well equipped to play.

Beretta ARX 100

The barrel isn’t as thin as it looks when compared to the rest of the gun.

So let’s look at the competition. One of the defining features of the AR-15 platform is its modularity. Stocks, grips, forends, switches, levers, even uppers—all can be changed to fit the preferences of the user. But that isn’t the root of modularity. Modularity, as a concept, was conceived so that (in this case) rifles could be built on the assembly-line process. No hand-fitting pieces together, just snap them in place. What now passes as tactical fashion only appeared as an afterthought.

We switch out grips and forends, seeking slight improvements in a gun that works quite well in its stock configuration. Changes that make a gun “custom” go against modularity. And a lot of the changes made to the AR platform require special tools. Changing out a barrel takes time. It is almost impossible to really alter the ways the controls work, unless you redesign the gun itself or add extra parts.

Beretta ARX 100

The flip-up rear sight has a six-position aperture to accommodate targets at distances.

The ARX changes some of this. You can still dress it up with accessories, but you can’t change out the stock, or the grip, or the forend. At least not yet. Instead, you can decide which of the three mag releases you want to use (left, right, or bottom). Within seconds, you can move the charging handle from the right to the left side. It is even easier to change ejection. A simple lever close to the stock switches the extractor from one side to the other.

Beretta will eventually have more calibers available, all of which will be interchangeable. And they won’t require any advanced modification by a gunsmith or armorer to be adaptable. Left-handed shooters can pick up any ARX and make it fit their needs in seconds. You can see why a platform like this would be appealing to a department that may want to equip a number of shooters.

The ARX 100 has one big leg up on most of the 5.56 competition. The rifle has a “constant contact/short-stroke gas piston system” that keeps fouling gases from emptying into the chamber. Even after shooting several hundred rounds this afternoon, the rifle remained incredibly clean. Though I can’t yet confirm this personally, I would imagine that this rifle won’t need to be cleaned as often as the typical AR. And when it does, cleaning the chamber will be much easier.

Beretta ARX 100

Even though the forend is wide, you can still hold the ARX thumb-over-bore.

The polymer chassis and stock make it light: seven pounds. This can be almost disconcerting. It looks much heavier than it is. When I picked it up, I was a bit shocked at how light it was. That’s a really attractive feature in a gun you may have to carry all day. And after you pull the trigger a couple of times, any misconceptions you may have about its ability to handle the recoil begin to fade. It is light, and the gun moves during recoil, but it is comparable to other 5.56s. When I was looking back at the video we shot on the range, I can see just how flat it shoots. There’s almost no rise at all.

Shooting the ARX 100

We shot a couple of different types of 5.56 and .223 through the rifle, and only one flavor gave us any issues. This rifle will not cycle steel-cased ammo. The steel-on-steel in the chamber was too much for the gun, and it couldn’t pull cases free. The extractor never popped off, which left an empty on the extractor. Clearing the jam wasn’t an issue, but you had to really muscle the bolt back all the way. After we’d gone to the range, I read some reports of issues with gen 3 PMAGS, but that isn’t something I can confirm yet. I’ll test it soon.

The ARX 100 is much more intimidating from this end.

The ARX 100 is much more intimidating from this end.

The rifle shoulders easily, and the irons are easy to use. The rear sight has six different apertures that will allow for target engagement out to 800 yards. Maybe. I had no problem with the irons at 25 yards, or 100, but I can’t image pulling the trigger on a target 800 yards out with only iron sights. I know it can be done, but it isn’t something we often ask of our tactical rifles.

The trigger on this rifle breaks somewhere north of 10 pounds. That’s where my scale stops. I would guess 11 pounds (and that is a very educated guess, thanks to the fact that the scale stops at 10 pounds). There is hardly any take-up, though. The break is clean, but heavy. Pull it like you mean it. I’m not sure what’s behind this. I’ve read that the trigger breaks closer to six pounds. I tested and retested, though.

The ARX 100 is going on sale this week, and the price is $1,950. This isn’t out of line with a lot of piston-driven 5.56 rifles. And if you consider how much most of us spend on our ARs, getting them to fit and run just right, it is a competitive price.

Beretta ARX 100

When the stock is folded, the BCG can be removed from this opening, but the lower has to be removed first.

I first shot the ARX at the Beretta factory in Accokeek, Maryland, almost two years ago. I shot it again at the SHOT show. I’ve been impressed by the basic performance of the gun and have only just begun to push it through the rigorous testing that we will do for this review. But so far, everything is running smoothly. I wish I could say that about all of the guns we get in here. I can’t. But I do expect civilian versions of tactical rifles to function, flawlessly, with absolutely no break-in period. And the ARX has met those expectations, except for the steel-cased .223.

Is the ARX 100 the Ultimate Tactical Rifle? I think we all recognize the obvious exaggeration. I will say this: the ARX 100 is forcing some new topics into the tactical conversation. The interchangeable calibers will be one area that the competition has to match. The ease of use, especially for lefties, isn’t easy to dismiss. The functionality-to-weight ratio makes other rifles in the same category seem unnecessarily heavy. And then there’s this—this gun may appeal even more to agencies than it will to individuals. If Beretta knows anything besides sporting shotguns and service pistols, it is contract competition. The ARX 100 may not be the ultimate, but it is going to change the game, and a couple of hundred AR-15 makers have just lost a bit more traction.

Beretta ARX 100

The ARX comes in a nice case that will hold the rifle, even with the stock extended.

Beretta ARX 100

The extension of the stock is secured by two interlocking points.

Beretta ARX 100

The two-sided ejection port allows for true ambidextrous operation.

Beretta ARX 100

The front post is also spring-loaded and comes with an adjustable post.

Beretta ARX 100

This incarnation of the rifle is being branded as the ARX 100 instead of the 160, which is the rifle in service with the Italian Army.

Beretta ARX 100

The safety selector is clear and easy to read, and the same on both sides of the gun.

Beretta ARX 100

The grip on the ARX is built into the lower, so there’s no way to change it out.

Beretta ARX 100

There’s a bottom magazine lever that can be used like an AK’s mag release.

Beretta ARX 100

The muzzle brake may be the only piece of the rifle Beretta didn’t try to reinvent.

Beretta ARX 100

The short-piston gas system keeps everything very clean.

Beretta ARX 100

If you have a grenade launcher, this is where it goes.

Beretta ARX 100

To switch the charging handle from one side to the other is easy. It pulls out and swings through.

Beretta ARX 100

The barrel can be removed in seconds. A simple lever holds it secure.

Beretta ARX 100

This button changes which side the rifle ejects from, and it is easy to change with the point of a bullet.

Beretta ARX 100

Beretta ARX 100

While the ARX 100 feels bulky, it is actually quite thin. This is the top view of the receiver.

Beretta ARX 100

The magazine well has just a bit of a flare, and magazines are easy to insert and extract.

Beretta ARX 100

The hammer is narrow, but the springs in the trigger look incredibly robust.



Posted:  6/9/2014 6:05 PM #42020
horselips


Joined: 5/2/2012
Posts: 2063
Last Post: 9/30/2014
For $1,950, there are no questions I care to ask that this rifle might answer. Whatever this turkey is capable of doing, you still don't want to be on the wrong end of anything I shoot that costs a quarter of that.

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