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Posted:  10/20/2012 8:29 AM #34707
rusty shackleford


Joined: 1/3/2012
Posts: 126
Last Post: 12/31/2013
Subject: A Glowing Concern
I recently watched the movie "Chernobyl Diaries", and in doing so have had my interest in nuclear energy rekindled. In doing further reading on radiation and the aspects of surviving a nuclear incident (accidental or otherwise) I find myself wondering;
 
Where can I, as a civillian with limited funds and knowledge, acquire a working, reliable, and easy to use Geiger Counter, or other radiation detection device, that doesnt require a degree in physics and mathematics to operate?
 
Although the threat of the great red menace is gone, the threat of a nuclear war, or simple accident at a nuclear reactor (like the south anna reactor about 15 miles from my house) still remains. This concerns me greatly, and I was wondering what all of you well informed and knowledgable people here at CTD might have to suggest on this topic. I am looking for some sort of radiation detector that is simple to use, requires no calibration (or if thats not possible at least suggest where I could get one calibrated, or where I could learn to calibrate it myself), and is relatively cheap and portable (lightweight). I did search ebay for geiger counters, but am wary to buy one without any knowledge of how to operate, calibrate, or determine the meaning of the readout of one. Any light you guys could shed on this subject would be appreciated.
ssssha shaw pocket sand!

Posted:  10/20/2012 4:02 PM #34717
horselips


Joined: 5/2/2012
Posts: 2062
Last Post: 8/19/2014
Cheaper Than Dirt sells a NukAlert radiation detector -item no. TRW-100 for $169. Amazon.com also sells a wide variety of radiation detectors and actual Geiger counters. Of course the only problem is they can only register the radiation that is already around them -and you- and by then it's probably too late. It's aura time! Too bad they can't register radiation that's a long way off, and merely on it's way so you have time to bug out. All is not lost - you do get to join Mathias and his zombies in pursuit of the Omega Man, or the Bomb worshipers in Beneath The Planet Of The Apes. And you won't have to buy any more of those stupid little 4 watt night light bulbs.  


Posted:  10/21/2012 2:49 AM #34723
AK47


Joined: 10/21/2012
Posts: 1
Last Post: 10/21/2012
new to CTD forums.
 
this is just a suggestion but my local military surplus store sells geiger counters for $100. even if you need someone to calibrate it i think it would be a good deal.
 
just my opinion.


Posted:  10/22/2012 9:59 AM #34746
CTD_Rob


Joined: 10/22/2012
Posts: 1
Last Post: 10/22/2012
The radiation detectors we sell DO work. However, they will only detect radiation at high levels. Originally, the civil defense detectors were created for use after a nuclear attack. They measure in Rads, which is no longer used. The detectors we sell are more for just having a working cold war relic on your desk. In response to your needs, a reliable radiation survey detector ALWAYS requires regular calibration, or detection levels could be off significantly. I spent seven years as a U.S. Air Force Chemical, Biological, and Nuclear Weapons Specialist, so I’ve seen my share of improperly calibrated equipment. Currently, the military is fielding the GR-135 Identifier. This thing is so sensitive that is can almost almost register the radiation levels in a banana (from the potassium). In recent years, the military fielded the ADM-300 kit. It is antiquated, but has an easy to read digital display. With attachments, it has the capability of reading alpha, beta, gamma, delta, neutron, and x-ray radiation. Since your primary concern involves a nuclear reactor 15 miles from your house, I think a simple medical dosimeter badge would be the way to go. Should an accident occur, your primary concern would be to bug out of the area. Keeping an eye on how much radiation you’ve absorbed would be helpful in case of a medical emergency. A disaster at a power plant would release a great deal of gamma energy, which is dangerous a longer ranges. A common medical dosimeter badge would let you know if you know when you’ve absorbed the maximum “safe” level of gamma or x-ray radiation. If you want to learn more about radiation response actions, check out these unclassified publications: Note: Unlike the Soviet facility in Chernobyl, the U.S. Nuclear power plants have massive safety features in place. We did some training with those guys a few years back. The facilities are resistant to all sorts of earthquakes, weather, attacks, and just about anything else you can imagine. While nothing is completely impossible, the emergency management personnel at those plant are passionate about what they do. Its nothing like Homer Simpson's plant in Springfield...trust me...LOL...

Posted:  11/3/2012 12:27 AM #34947
rusty shackleford


Joined: 1/3/2012
Posts: 126
Last Post: 12/31/2013
Thank you for the intel. My main concern with my local reactor is that every few weeks I read about it in the news paper, it survived our recent earthquake here in VA with no real trouble, the safeties kicked in and shut the whole thing down like they were supposed to, but I feel its always best to be on the safe side. I do however have a follow-up question. Is it not possible for "them" to make a radiation detector that simply has 3 readings, "normal" "caution" and "get the hell out of there"? I understand very little when it comes to measuring radiation, I attempted to read up on it on wikipedia but immediatley became confused, I did think before reading your reply that they still used rads, I wonder why they dont anymore. All in all I wish they would come up with a simple device that takes AA batteries and simply tells you whether or not you need to get the hell outta dodge, or if its too late and you needn't bother, I dont want to be waiting around to hear the second 1 minute long siren from the power plant to know somethings up (they do 3, 1 minute long blasts of the siren, 1 minute apart each, we heard the test last year and it scared the pants off of me because I didnt know it was a test until I turned the radio on). also, where do you have a geiger counter calibrated? is that something someone at a near by local college could do possibly? and how reactive are dosimeters, do they immediatley alert me to the amount of radiation I am absoring or do I have to do something special to have it read out?
ssssha shaw pocket sand!

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