Finding the right holster should not be hard to do, but it can be. How many of us have a box, bag, or drawer full of holsters we do not use? Why are they there? Like most people, you likely purchased them and they either did not fit your gun, were the wrong type, did not wear comfortably or they were for the wrong side.

To find the right holster you need to ask yourself a couple of questions.

  1. What hand do I draw and shoot with?
    What? Too simple you say, but think about this; most shooters are right-handed, but if you are left-handed you want a holster that you can draw easily from with your strong hand. Also there are many people that buy a shoulder holster thinking that the left hand holsters are correct because they want the gun under their left arm, when the correct holster is a right-handed holster. If you want an inside-the-pants holster worn in the small of the back and are a right-handed shooter, than you want a left-handed holster. This will put the gun's handle in a position that will be easer to grab. Inside-the-pocket holsters are constructed where one side is stiff and flat, which is to help hide the outline of the gun in your pocket, the wrong side will show the outline of the gun in your pocket.
  2. What type of material are you looking for?
    You can pick leather, nylon, or molded plastic. Leather is good for a comfortable concealed carry holster that is worn on the belt or inside the pants. Nylon works great for carrying your handgun when out hunting, in either a shoulder holster or a belt holster. Nylon also work well when you want a holster that it not affected by sweat or water. Molded plastic is good for concealed carry on the belt; most are molded to lock the gun in place without the need of a retention strap. Nylon, leather and plastic can be molded to fit a certain model of gun, for a tight precision fit. Nylon is normally the cheapest in price, molded plastic can cost a little more if it is a mass-produced holster or a lot more if the holsters is custom-molded. Leather is normally going to cost the most, but almost all leather holsters are made by hand and take time to construct.
  3. What type of carry position do you want?
    There are many different carry positions, on the belt, inside the pants, on the ankle, in the pocket, in a shoulder holster, in the small of the back, in a fanny pack, or on the thigh. Carry position is very important. For example, you would not want to carry a large gun like the S&W 500 in an ankle holster. But some people do try to carry a large-frame gun like the Ruger P90 or Beretta 92 on the ankle and you can see it within about 20 feet of them, not what you want for concealment. Pick the holster that works best for your style of carry. If you are carrying the gun for hunting, a shoulder holster or belt holster would be a good pick. For SWAT or a tactical situation the thigh or leg holster would work well.
  4. What size is your gun and what size is your body?
    You also have to think about your body size. Someone that has a small frame may not want a large gun pulling down on their belt. A person with a large frame can carry a larger gun on the belt or shoulder. Think about your size and the size of your gun. Remember, in a lot of states where concealed carry is allowed the gun has to be kept hidden, so pick a holster that keeps the gun close and well hidden on your body.